Is blogging every day a good thing or a bad thing or just a thing?

Today on Discover, WordPress’ new curated site, there is an interview piece by Cheri Lucas Rowlands entitled “Author Alec Nevala-Lee on Writing and Blogging Every Day.”

In the interview, Alec Nevala-Lee talks about the benefits of blogging every day – he’s written a 500-word piece every day for over five years along with several books. The connection isn’t linear as in more blogging, more book sales. It’s more complex than that.

He says, “But in less tangible respects, the payoff has been enormous. Publishing five hundred words every day has forced me to master a new bag of tricks, and as a result, I’ve become more efficient in every aspect of my working life.”

I feel that way about my current streak – a blog post every day since November 1st. The discipline of it is yielding something but I’m not quite sure I can describe what. Perhaps it’s the appreciation of adhering to the discipline. I don’t do anything else everyday except take a shower and brush my teeth.

I don’t meditate or run five miles every day. I don’t do crunches or read the Bible every day. I don’t even walk the dogs every day even though I have this message on my white board:

Walk Dogs

But I blog every day. At least for the past 51 days, I’ve blogged everyday. So what are the benefits of blogging every day?

  1. I haven’t gone off the deep end. Self-pity is a corollary to hearing loss or any disability. If I hadn’t been blogging through my hearing loss and especially through this cochlear implant process, I’d be a mess.
  2. I’ve tried new things. The most recent was my lame attempt at haiku inspired by the cloth bags of rice at the Indian market. It was so bad I thought about going back to make it better but was stumped about how to do that. Limericks may be next.
  3. I feel connected. Even though I’m in a bit of an exile from regular life while I recuperate/retrain from my cochlear implant, responses to my blog posts make me feel functional. Summed up: blogging makes me feel well.
  4. I remain free to fail. I think being willing to have a piece go flat is a big asset in writing and blogging. The more you blog, the more chances you take. You also get beyond the sure-fire win of the big confessional: How My In-Laws Ruined Christmas By Not Letting Me Bring My Ex and His Pit Bull Even Though My Husband Said It Was Okay.
  5. Amongst the chaff (of which there is much) is the wheat. I’ve had a couple of pretty decent pieces during this period. The one that makes me the happiest is the one that ended up on the Erma Bombeck Writing Workshop site. I remember the night I wrote Mr. Tan Shoes and Me at KFC. It was late. I was tired. I had no interest in writing. And then the story showed up. If I wasn’t blogging every day, I would have put it off. And it would have evaporated. Poof.

So is blogging a good thing or a bad thing or a just a thing? It’s just a thing.

But for the time being, it’s my thing.